MA in Translation at the University of Surrey – One of the longest-running courses worldwide

It’s not really like me at all. I’m generally a doer, rather than a talker. But when I graduated with my French Studies BA in July 2007, I applied to do a comparative literature masters at UCL the following year and then, when that came around, I deferred another year, then eventually pulled out completely. Then I signed up for the DipTrans preparation course at Westminster, went to a couple of classes, got scared out of my wits at how inexperienced I was, and gave up. Then I just talked about my longing to do a translation MA for years. The problem was, it was never “the right time”.

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Review of the Distance-learning MA in Translation at the University of Bristol

Flexibility

This is the Bristol MA’s USP. For a start, it’s entirely based on distance learning. All teaching is on-line: there’s never any need to visit the campus. This is of course invaluable for anyone who has other commitments to juggle, as I did at the time (I graduated in 2015). What’s more, the course can be completed either in one year full-time, or over two to three years part-time, starting in either September or January.

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My MA in Translation Studies at Cardiff University

natalie-soper-cardiffIn 2011, I found myself in the same situation as many other students: nearing the end of my undergraduate degree – in my case, a BA (Hons) in French and Spanish – and unsure of what to do next. I had really enjoyed the translation modules during my course, so I decided to continue down this road, and, a few months later, began my year-long MA in Translation Studies at Cardiff University.

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Review of MA Theory and Practice of Translation at SOAS, University of London

soasToday’s guest post has been written by Jennifer O’Donnell on her MA in Theory and Practice of Translation at SOAS and it is part of this blog’s series on MA courses in Translation and Interpreting (currently divided into European and Non-European sections). If you have done an MA relatively recently and would be interested in writing about your experience to help future students, then please get in touch. You’ll find more information about writing for this blog and a list of all guest posts here.

As far as I was concerned, the School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS) was one of the best language schools in Europe. It was a school that stuck in my mind as prestigious, hard to get into and seriously driven to improving the understanding of other cultures and languages. Actually studying there was… not what I had imagined.

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