Make a Loan and Change a Life with Lendwithcare

I’m delighted to present a different type of guest post on my blog today. It’s been written by Lendwithcare, a non-profit microfinance lending website run by the charity CARE International UK. For over a year now I’ve been looking forward to receiving emails from Lendwithcare at the end of every month telling me how much the people I’ve helped previously with loans have managed to pay back and deciding who to lend £15 to now. So far, I’ve made 28 loans and helped 469 entrepreneurs and their family members. I hope you’ll be inspired by this post to lend to business owners that are less fortunate than ourselves.

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Machine Translation and its Different Types

Guest blog by Yves Savourel, Vice President of R&D at Argos Multilingual

Machine translation (MT) has become a very important topic in the world of languages and translations. More and more companies have begun to apply MT as it can benefit their translation projects. But what exactly is machine translation and which different types exist? These are the points I’m going to look at more closely in the following post.

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La révision : un sac de nœuds ?

Cette version française de mon article de blog Revision: a Can of Worms? a été traduite par Élisa Marcel dans le cadre de sa formation de Master TSM (Traduction Spécialisée Multilingue) à l’université de Lille. Cette traduction était publiée à l’origine sur le blog MasterTSM@Lille.

 

Quand est-ce qu’une révision va trop loin ?

Quand est-ce qu’une traduction n’en est pas une ?

La révision est un sujet très épineux, comme je l’ai déjà mentionné dans mon premier billet sur le sujet. Elle peut engendrer beaucoup de sentiments négatifs si vous pensez que les changements apportés à votre travail n’étaient pas utiles et si l’opinion du réviseur pourrait vous faire perdre un client.

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To freelance or not to freelance? That is the question SUFT helps you answer

Although an MA in Translation Studies can be a springboard to many avenues (such as a PhD), I was keen to pursue translation itself and make a healthy contribution to the industry. I am also nowhere near clever enough for a doctorate and my parents would be less than enamoured about me sponging off them for the next three years.

Therefore, although interested in securing a full time in-house translation position or internship, I read an advert about the SUFT (Setting Up as a Freelance Translator) course in the January/February ITI Bulletin. The course sounded particularly interesting and had positive reviews by previous students. I was after a realistic, “warts ‘n’ all” insight into what running a freelance translation business is like and it would also keep my options open. I duly applied on the closing day for applications (I like to live dangerously) and was kindly accepted. Being an ITI member, payment was £349, but £499 for non-members (excellent value at either fee as it turned out).

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Translation begins at 40 after MA from Sheffield

After being made redundant in the summer of 2016 from a non-language-based role with the Home Office, I decided that I finally wanted to return to using my languages regularly, rather than merely on holiday or for the occasional rendition. Translation, in particular, had always held an attraction and not just involving Modern Languages, as my Latin A level testifies. Translation had seemed a dream job and more realistic than my other illusion of becoming a professional snooker player.

Having been based in Sheffield since 2002, I was fortunate that there were still vacancies on the popular MA in Translation Studies (worth 180 credits) in the University’s School of Languages and Cultures and I was duly accepted. I was also confident that my languages were still pretty good and my 2.1 from Bradford undoubtedly helped.

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22 nouvelles raisons pour lesquelles une agence peut cesser de faire appel à vous

Cette version française de mon article de blog 22 more reasons why an agency might stop working with you a été traduite par Clothilde Radisson dans le cadre de sa formation de Master TSM (Traduction Spécialisée Multilingue) à l’université de Lille. Cette traduction était publiée à l’origine sur le blog MasterTSM@Lille.

En octobre 2014, j’avais publié sur mon ancien blog un billet concernant les raisons pour lesquelles une agence pourrait décider de mettre fin à sa collaboration avec vous. Le billet original ainsi que sa version republiée sur ce blog WordPress « My Words for a Change » ayant suscité beaucoup d’intérêt et de commentaires, j’ai décidé d’énumérer ci-dessous quelques raisons supplémentaires pour lesquelles une agence pourrait tout à coup cesser de vous contacter par e-mail ou par téléphone. Ces raisons sont fondées sur votre feedback et sur quelques-unes de mes propres observations.

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Review of MA Translation Theory & Practice at University College London (2014–2016, taught part-time)

The Careers in Translation and Interpreting Conference in May 2013 at Aston University in Birmingham organised by Routes into Languages inspired me to apply for the MA Translation Theory & Practice at UCL as part of a career change. The application process was straightforward: BA (Hon) results of at least 2:1, IELTS (Academic) result of at least 7.6 and a written personal statement.

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