To freelance or not to freelance? That is the question SUFT helps you answer

Although an MA in Translation Studies can be a springboard to many avenues (such as a PhD), I was keen to pursue translation itself and make a healthy contribution to the industry. I am also nowhere near clever enough for a doctorate and my parents would be less than enamoured about me sponging off them for the next three years.

Therefore, although interested in securing a full time in-house translation position or internship, I read an advert about the SUFT (Setting Up as a Freelance Translator) course in the January/February ITI Bulletin. The course sounded particularly interesting and had positive reviews by previous students. I was after a realistic, “warts ‘n’ all” insight into what running a freelance translation business is like and it would also keep my options open. I duly applied on the closing day for applications (I like to live dangerously) and was kindly accepted. Being an ITI member, payment was £349, but £499 for non-members (excellent value at either fee as it turned out).

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Nouveau cap pour le secteur de la traduction : la post-édition

Cette version française de mon article de blog The Latest Trend in the Translation Industry: PEMT a été traduite par Clovis Cerri dans le cadre de sa formation de Master TSM (Traduction Spécialisée Multilingue) à l’université de Lille. Cette traduction était publiée à l’origine sur le blog MasterTSM@Lille.

Avez-vous entendu parler de la dernière tendance sur le marché de la traduction ? Il s’agit de la PEMT, acronyme anglophone signifiant post-editing machine translation. En clair, les clients font appel à un programme pour traduire leur texte, lequel est ensuite envoyé à un traducteur chargé d’y apporter la touche finale. Certains d’entre eux utilisent des services de traduction automatique plus poussés que ceux disponibles en ligne. Néanmoins, l’expérience me prouve que Google Traduction est l’outil le plus populaire, et c’est donc celui auquel les clients ont le plus souvent recours pour obtenir leur traduction au coût d’une révision, soit environ 50 % du prix.

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The Challenges of Regular Posting – Translation & Interpreting Blog Survey Results (Part 4)

Once you’ve started a blog, how do you keep it going? What can get in the way of posting regularly? The majority of the survey respondents (59%) admitted they didn’t update their translation and/or interpreting blogs at least once every six weeks. In this fourth and final part of the results, we’ll gain some insights into why some bloggers find it hard to publish posts frequently.

The most obvious and most frequent explanation for not writing more often was time constraints.

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What Readers Want – Translation & Interpreting Blog Survey Results (Part 3)

In Part 2 of these results we looked at the many reasons why people do and don’t blog. Unless you’re running a blog to improve your writing skills and keep a record of your ideas, you need readers. And to attract readers, you have to write about topics that interest them. Nearly 85% of the survey respondents read translation and interpreting blogs. Let’s find out why they read them and what puts the other 15% off.

As expected, the top response in favour of reading blogs was professional interest:

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Translation begins at 40 after MA from Sheffield

After being made redundant in the summer of 2016 from a non-language-based role with the Home Office, I decided that I finally wanted to return to using my languages regularly, rather than merely on holiday or for the occasional rendition. Translation, in particular, had always held an attraction and not just involving Modern Languages, as my Latin A level testifies. Translation had seemed a dream job and more realistic than my other illusion of becoming a professional snooker player.

Having been based in Sheffield since 2002, I was fortunate that there were still vacancies on the popular MA in Translation Studies (worth 180 credits) in the University’s School of Languages and Cultures and I was duly accepted. I was also confident that my languages were still pretty good and my 2.1 from Bradford undoubtedly helped.

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22 nouvelles raisons pour lesquelles une agence peut cesser de faire appel à vous

Cette version française de mon article de blog 22 more reasons why an agency might stop working with you a été traduite par Clothilde Radisson dans le cadre de sa formation de Master TSM (Traduction Spécialisée Multilingue) à l’université de Lille. Cette traduction était publiée à l’origine sur le blog MasterTSM@Lille.

En octobre 2014, j’avais publié sur mon ancien blog un billet concernant les raisons pour lesquelles une agence pourrait décider de mettre fin à sa collaboration avec vous. Le billet original ainsi que sa version republiée sur ce blog WordPress « My Words for a Change » ayant suscité beaucoup d’intérêt et de commentaires, j’ai décidé d’énumérer ci-dessous quelques raisons supplémentaires pour lesquelles une agence pourrait tout à coup cesser de vous contacter par e-mail ou par téléphone. Ces raisons sont fondées sur votre feedback et sur quelques-unes de mes propres observations.

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To Blog or Not to Blog – Translation & Interpreting Blog Survey Results (Part 2)

Back in 2013, when I first started My Words for a Change on Blogger (before moving to WordPress in 2015), the pressure on freelance translators and interpreters to blog was quite intense. We were constantly being told that blogging was a must for marketing and SEO (Search Engine Optimization) purposes and to attract clients (as we learned in Part 1 of these results). I felt positively guilty for months because I had nothing to say (hard to believe now, I know, because once I started, I couldn’t stop) and felt that launching myself into the blogosphere was quite scary.

Judging by the responses to the translation & interpreting blog survey, I’m not alone in feeling compelled to blog:

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