The four o’clockish in the morning club: a tale of insomnia

The other day I was speaking to my niece, who lives abroad, on the phone, not something we do regularly, and she asked how I was. ‘Tired,’ I answered. ‘You’re always tired,’ she sighed back. And she’s right. But there’s generally not much else an insomniac can say.

While some people seem to manage on just a few hours of sleep (lots of politicians only get four to five hours, apparently, including Trump,  but I’m not sure that’s worked in his favour as he doesn’t make much sense most of the time), if I get less than six hours too many days in a row, my brain switches off.

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A New Year’s approach to exercising for freelance translators seeking a perfect work–life balance

Many freelancers start their solo career with grand visions of achieving a perfect work–life balance. They plan to shop when the supermarket is quiet, go for long runs on sunny days or take extended lunch breaks to meet up with friends who have also seen the freelancing light.

Six months of working ten hours per day later, and the dream turns out to be somewhat different from reality. Of course, although this isn’t the case for all freelancers, it is for many. Underestimating the time drain that running your own business can entail can play a key role in this. Tasks like marketing, networking and VAT returns (for starters) all take time away from hours that can be spent actually billing clients. This is part of what chips away at that initial vision.

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On Loneliness, Friendship and Resolutions

Ours can be a very lonely profession. Especially if we live on our own or are tied to the home as parents or carers. And jobs that ping into our inbox at unexpected times can make us change our plans and batten down the hatches until we meet the deadline. Because we need the money, don’t want to disappoint the client or cannot find anyone else to take the work on for us. And perhaps also because we’ve become workaholics.

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From Standing Out to Standing Up

Andrew Morris Desk 3In today’s guest post Andrew Morris explains why he bought a Varidesk and how it’s changed the way he works (by the way, I’m posting this while standing on my Steppie).

Like most translators, I used to think I was just a head. After all, that’s where it happens, right? We think, we analyse, we transform texts from one language to another. We’re all very cerebral.

Each day as I sat at my desk, I wasn’t even aware of my body. It was just a vehicle for getting my head close enough to the screen to do its work. I fed it and washed it, much like I do my car. But didn’t really give it much TLC.

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