Bump up your CPD with BP translation conference videos

You have until 4 November to take advantage of special discounts to watch BP conference videos. You can decide to watch just one, all of the BP18 videos, the current library (BP16 to BP18) or everything plus lifetime access to future videos. Your purchase (except buying just one video) will also give you chances to win a ticket to the next conference, BP19 in Bologna, at the beginning of May.

Continue reading

The Challenges of Regular Posting – Translation & Interpreting Blog Survey Results (Part 4)

Once you’ve started a blog, how do you keep it going? What can get in the way of posting regularly? The majority of the survey respondents (59%) admitted they didn’t update their translation and/or interpreting blogs at least once every six weeks. In this fourth and final part of the results, we’ll gain some insights into why some bloggers find it hard to publish posts frequently.

The most obvious and most frequent explanation for not writing more often was time constraints.

Continue reading

What Readers Want – Translation & Interpreting Blog Survey Results (Part 3)

In Part 2 of these results we looked at the many reasons why people do and don’t blog. Unless you’re running a blog to improve your writing skills and keep a record of your ideas, you need readers. And to attract readers, you have to write about topics that interest them. Nearly 85% of the survey respondents read translation and interpreting blogs. Let’s find out why they read them and what puts the other 15% off.

As expected, the top response in favour of reading blogs was professional interest:

Continue reading

To Blog or Not to Blog – Translation & Interpreting Blog Survey Results (Part 2)

Back in 2013, when I first started My Words for a Change on Blogger (before moving to WordPress in 2015), the pressure on freelance translators and interpreters to blog was quite intense. We were constantly being told that blogging was a must for marketing and SEO (Search Engine Optimization) purposes and to attract clients (as we learned in Part 1 of these results). I felt positively guilty for months because I had nothing to say (hard to believe now, I know, because once I started, I couldn’t stop) and felt that launching myself into the blogosphere was quite scary.

Judging by the responses to the translation & interpreting blog survey, I’m not alone in feeling compelled to blog:

Continue reading

Blogging is Not Dead – Translation & Interpreting Blog Survey Results (Part 1)

Back in early January 2018, I decided to create the translation and interpreting blog survey because I wanted to find out whether blogging was a worthwhile activity for colleagues and myself. I’d noticed that many blogs listed in my blogroll had disappeared completely (so I had to remove them) and others hadn’t been updated with new posts for months and in some cases years.

It had also been suggested that Facebook, with its immediate exchanges and discussions taking place in a large number of groups ranging from general (Watercooler, The League of Extraordinary Translators, Things Translators Never Say) to specific (Tourism Translators, Translators who use Speech Recognition, memoQ Users), was the new preferred hangout for translators and interpreters.

Continue reading

Updated ‘Useful Links’ Page

The ‘Useful Links’ page on my blog is by far the most popular with almost 9,500 views so far. I’ve been working on it in recent weeks, adding some new links that I’ve come across over the past few months. Some of you may have noticed that the clickable ‘Back to top’ hasn’t been working. For some unknown reason, every time I add anything to the page, all the ‘Back to tops’ stop functioning and I have to fix the coding one by one. They should all be working properly again now.

Continue reading

My MA in Translation Studies with Interpreting at the University of Nottingham

nottinghamI’d always planned to become a translator. The career seemed to fit my abilities and interests well so the die was cast on my academic path. The translation modules I did as part of my undergraduate degree in Modern Language Studies (French, Spanish and Dutch) only whetted my appetite further for continuing my study of translation. Then, as if almost by a stroke of fate, just as I was starting my final undergraduate year, the university’s Cultures, Languages and Area Studies department announced that they would be introducing a postgraduate programme in Translation Studies – with the option to study interpreting as a supplementary module. I leapt at the chance to apply for a place as soon as I could, and so began my Master’s degree at the University of Nottingham.

Continue reading

Review of MATI at the Middlebury Institute of International Studies

montereyToday’s guest post is by Deepti Limaye and it’s our second on an MA course outside Europe.

The Middlebury Institute of International Studies (MIIS), formerly known as the Monterey Institute of International Studies, offers four degree programs in translation and interpreting—MAT (Translation), MATI (Translation and Interpretation), MATLM (Translation and Localization Management), and MACI (Conference Interpreting)—in Chinese, French, German, Japanese, Korean, Russian, and Spanish. Some Portuguese translation and interpreting classes have also been offered since 2012. I finished the coursework for the MATI program in Spanish in May 2015, and will be graduating in December 2016, after defending my translation thesis.

Continue reading

Plea for Help with MA Translation & Interpreting Review Project

books-magazines-building-school

Since June 2015 my blog has featured guest posts by colleagues who have completed an MA in translation and/or interpreting. What started out as just an idea to provide future MA students with useful information has grown into a huge project that is larger than I am, which is why I’m now appealing for help.

If you are interested in this project and might have some time to spare between jobs, then please read on.

Continue reading