What I learned in October 2016

calendar-1712508_1280It’s nearly December now and here I am just getting around to writing about last month. Following weeks of working on one project after another, and being lucky enough for clients to agree to wait in the queue, I’m finally enjoying a bit of breathing space. Hopefully it won’t signal a famine period for me as I am only free because I couldn’t make the deadline for one largish project and didn’t fancy anything else I was offered.

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What I learned in March 2016

calendar-1174839_1280As I’m not the most tech-savvy of people, it usually takes me a while to pick up the basics, let alone the niceties, of any program. In March I finally learned a few more commands in DNS (Dragon Naturally Speaking), specifically how to underline, put in italics and make bold. For example, in the previous sentence, if you want to put “specifically” in italics, you say “select specifically” followed by “italicise that”. If you want to underline it, you select it and then say “underline that” and (I’m sure you’ve got the idea by now) if you want it to be bold, you say “bold that”.

Made a mistake and want to reverse what you’ve done? Just select the word again and repeat the same commands. In other words, if specifically is already in italics and you say “select specifically, italicise that”, it will revert back to normal Roman type. I also tried this with “All caps that” (the command to capitalise a word or phrase you’ve previously selected), but unfortunately it didn’t work.

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5 Lessons I Learned While Writing A Book About Interpreting

5 lessons I learnedFor the past few months, I have been working on a draft of my first book, Being a Successful Interpreter: Adding Value and Delivering Excellence. It has been an amazing and sometimes nerve-wracking process that has taught me far more than just writing. In fact, it is no exaggeration to say that I learned as much from the process of writing the book as I did from researching the content. Here are my top five lessons.

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Wimbledon-inspired guest post for eCPD Webinars

Wimbledon is nearly over for another year, just the final matches to go. Whilst watching as much tennis as possible, I was struck by some parallels between translation and this sport, so I decided to use this as an idea for a guest post eCPD Webinars had asked me to write. Whether you’re a tennis fan or not, I hope you enjoy the analogy.

Strawberries, cream and sparks of genius: Tennis parallels to help us be the best we can become

An Overview of the Master’s in Translation (and Interpreting) at Westminster University (Part Two)

Deep End 2Welcome to the second half of our guest post on Nikki’s blog, My Words for a Change! For those of you who didn’t read last week, Nikki kindly invited The Deep End to write a guest blog post on our experiences at Westminster University. Please read on to find out more, and take a look at last week’s post!

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An Overview of the Master’s in Translation (and Interpreting) at Westminster University (Part One)

Deep EndNikki kindly invited The Deep End (Claire Harmer, Katharine Mears, Felicity Pearce, Paula Pitkethly and Sandra Young) to write a guest blog post on our experiences at Westminster University. Since we studied there in 2010-2011, in this post we have tried to indicate any major changes that have taken place on the course, but if you would like further information about the current programmes on offer, please visit the Westminster University website or contact Alexa Alfer, the university’s Translation Studies Programme Director (A.Alfer01@westminster.ac.uk).

Each of us have taken a specific aspect of the course to expand on, hoping to give anyone thinking about taking the plunge into the world of translation and interpreting an insight into the programme and the lecturers, to see if Westminster offers the right course for them.

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